Sara Tromp

School of Biological Sciences
The University of Queensland
Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia
61 4 3876 3594
s.tromp1@uq.edu.au




Education


The University of Queensland
PhD Candidate
School of Integrative Biology    Current

University of Queensland
Honours in Science
Behavioural Ecology
Graduated June 2005
University of Queensland
Bachelor of Science
Zoology and Wildlife Biology
Graduated June 2004



Experience


University of Queensland, School of Integrative Biology, Brisbane, QLD 4072. PhD Candidate. 50 hours per week. $19,231 per year. 01 January 2007 – present. Supervisor: Anne Goldizen.

Phylogeography and conservation of granite inselberg specialists in Namibia.  My research objectives are to (1) confirm the species status of the black mongoose (Galerella nigrata) and the phylogenetic relationships of the Galerella genus; (2) investigate the phylogeography of the endemic black mongoose and compare it with the genetic variability of numerous other saxicolous species found in the same habitat; (3) describe the social behaviour and mating system of the black mongoose relating this to intermediate levels of sociality observed in other Herpestidae; (4) use the knowledge gained in this study to make appropriate management recommendations Namibia's inselberg specialists.

University of Queensland, School of Integrative Biology, Brisbane, QLD 4072.  Academic Tutor.  10-15 hours per week, $30.33 per hour. June 2009 - December 2009.

Appointed as an academic tutor for first year Botany students, second year Zoology students, third year and postgraduate Fainforest Ecology (Field Studies) students at the university. My duties included supervising and assisting practical projects, supervision of student field projects, demonstration and supervision of small mammal trapping, and marking of assignments and examinations.

University of Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia.  Masters Supervisor.  50 hours per week. Voluntary. June 2007 – December 2008.  Co-supervisor: Dr. John Mfune.

Assistant supervisor for a masters student, Dietlinde Nakwaya.  My duties included field project planning, writing of research proposal, supervision of field work and final write-up of thesis.  The primary aim of this project was to describe how the black mongoose exploits the available food resources in Namibia's unique granite inselberg ecosystem.  We investigated the dietary preference (availability vs. choice) of the black mongoose as well as assessing seasonal and spatial variation in the diet of the black mongoose.  Dietlinde has since gone on to find employment at the National Museum of Namibia and we are currently writing a paper together on her research findings.    

University of Queensland, School of Integrative Biology, Brisbane, QLD 4072.  Academic Tutor.  10-15 hours per week, $30.33 per hour. June 2007 - December 2008.

Appointed as an academic tutor for first year Botany students, second year Ecology and Environment students, third year Conservation Biology students and postgraduate Conservation and Wildlife Biology students at the university. My duties included supervising and assisting practical projects and marking of assignments and examinations.

University of Queensland, School of Integrative Biology, Brisbane, QLD 4072.  Academic Tutor.  40 hours per week, $30.33 per hour. June 2007.

Appointed as an academic tutor for second year Marine Biology students at the university.  My duties included supervising and assisting field work at Moreton Bay Research Station, North Stradbroke Island and marking of assignments.

University of Queensland, Prof. Scott O'Neill Laboratory, School of Integrative Biology, Brisbane, QLD 4072.  Research Assistant.  20-30 hours per week, $30.33 per hour. August 2002 - July 2004.  Scott O'Neill.

Employed as a research assistant in a molecular laboratory focussing on Wolbachia, an intracellular bacterium.  My duties included assisting researchers in the laboratory, undertaking independent projects outlined by the laboratory supervisor, laboratory upkeep and website updating.


Publications

Peer reviewed articles

Tromp S.A., Pays O., Putland D.A. and Goldizen A.W. (2009).  Environmental and social factors affecting hesitation and vigilance of black-faced impala (Aepyceros melampus petersi) at waterholes in Etosha National Park.  Submitted for review.

Carter A., Goldizen A.W. and Tromp S.A. (2010).  Rock agamas exhibit behavioral syndromes: bolder males bask and feed more but may suffer higher predation.  Behavioral Ecology 21:655-661.



Other articles

Tromp S.A. (2009).  It's in the genes: Habitat islands and conservation of small vertebrates in Namibia.  Roan News 1: 14-16.



Honours Thesis

Tromp S.A. (2005).  Black-faced impalas' perceptions of predation risk: what environmental and social factors affect their hesitation at waterholes?  Honours Thesis.  School of Integrative Biology, University of Queensland, Australia.



Presentations

Tromp S.A. June 2010.  "The effects of past climatic fluctuations and landscape features on the genetics of mongooses endemic to Namibia's granite inselbergs."  Society for Conservation Biology, Edmonton Canada.

Tromp S.A. November 2009.  "Evolutionary processes affecting taxa on Namibia's granite inselbergs."  University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Tromp S.A. November 2009.  "Phylogeography of granite inselberg specialists in Namibia."  Postgraduate Student Poster Presentation.  University of Queensland, Brisbane.  pdf 

Tromp S.A.  November 2007.  "Phylogenetic status, phylogeography and social organisation of the black mongoose, Galerella nigrata."  University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Tromp S.A. November 2007.  "Introducing Galerella nigrata."  Postgraduate Student Poster Presentation.  University of Queensland, Brisbane.   pdf 

Tromp S.A.  July 2007.  "Introducing the Black Mongoose, Galerella nigrata."  Wildlife Society of Namibia, Windhoek.

Tromp S.A.  June 2005.  "Drink or die? Social and environmental factors that affect Impalas' perceptions of risk at waterholes."  Honours seminars,  University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Tromp S.A.  October 2003.  "Does Wolbachia have an effect on flight strength and duration in Drosophila?"  Advanced Study Program in Science Undergraduate Research, Brisbane.

McGraw E.A., Tromp S.A. and O'Neill S.L.  June 2003.  "The effects of Wolbachia pipientis outside of the germ line."  Socielty for the Study of Evolution, Chico California.




Research Grants


Funding Agency Year Amount  AUD
Wilderness Safaris Wildlife Trust 

Wilderness Safaris Wildlife Trust

Winifred Violet Scott Foundation

Go Green (NedBank)
2007

2008

2009

2009   


$6,648

$7,480

$12,000

$8,800

Total       $34,928


Activities


Reviewer for EcoScience.  2009 - present.

Workshop, analytical methods for population genetics.  Australian National University, ACT, Australia.  October 2009.

Volunteer, giraffe research project.  Etosha Ecological Institute, Etosha National Park, Namibia.  May and June 2009.

Volunteer, squirrel glider research project.  University of Queensland, QLD, Australia. October 2008.

Volunteer, dishonest signalling in crayfish.  University of Queensland, QLD, Australia. November 2007.

Annual game count.  Etosha Ecological Institute,  Etosha National Park, Namibia.  November 2006 and June 2007.  

Volunteer, marine classes.  Glendyne Education and Training Centre, QLD, Australia.  June - December 2005.

Artificial insemination and embryo transfer.  Yarrabee Boer Goat Stud, QLD, Australia.  2000 - 2001.

Emergency management veterinary nursing.  Chisipite Veterinary Surgery, Zimbabwe.  1995 - 1999.

Volunteer, darting and relocation of Painted Hunting Dogs (Lycaon pictus).  Painted Hunting Dog Research Project, Zimbabwe.  August 1998.

Travel, photography, bush life, music, training of working dogs, horse riding, piloting sail planes.


Awards

Australian Postgraduate Award.  University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia  2007-2009

Queensland Smart Woman, Smart State Award.  Queensland, Australia  2004

Best Poster Design.  University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia  2009

Postgraduate Travel Award.  School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia  2010




References


Dr. Anne W. Goldizen. Associate Professor, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia.  a.goldizen@uq.edu.au

Dr. Louise Kuchel.  Academic Staff, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia.  l.kuchel@uq.edu.au

Thomas Gorringe.  Scientific Officer, General Staff, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia.  t.gorringe@uq.edu.au

Mr. Wilferd Versfeld.  Science Warden, Etosha Ecological Institute, Okaukuejo, Etosha National Park, Namibia.  versfeld@mweb.com.na





"For since the creation of the world God's invisible qualities have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse."    Romans 1:20